9 Minutes from Manhattan
90 million years back in time

 
 

2017 Season

OPEN LABOR DAY!

10am - 6pm


The park is closed Septmember 5 to September 22.

 

 

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DILOPHOSAURUS


< Back to All Dinosaurs
 

FAST FACTS

PERIOD: EARLY JURASSIC
LENGTH: UP TO 6 M
WEIGHT: UP TO 0.5 TONS

How do you say it?

die-LOAF-oh-SAWR-us

Discovery:

When:       1942
Where:      Arizona
By Who:    Sam Welles
 

Fun Facts: 

Dilophosaurus is the only dinosaur in Jurassic Park portrayed to be much smaller than it
actually is. It did not have a colorful flap of skin around its neck, and did not spit poison at its
victims, to the best of our knowledge.

Dilophosaurus had a notch between its front teeth on its upper jaw, and the rear teeth, much
like crocodiles do today. This may indicate that it ate fish like modern crocodiles do.
Perhaps this explains why they hung out around the edges of lakes so much?

Northern New Jersey is one of the best places in the world to find early dinosaur footprints.
One of the most common is called Eubrontes, which is believed to have been made by a
dinosaur like Dilophosaurus, as it walked along the muddy edges of lakes.

Color

What did dinosaurs really look like?

We know an astonishing amount about what dinosaurs really looked like. We know about their shapes, how long their legs were, how big their eyes were, and much, much more. But we still don't know the answer to one of the most commonly asked questions: "How do we know what color they were?" 

Well, the short answer is, we don't. It's possible that they were neon pink with flashing yellow polka dots. However, that is very unlikely. Think about the animals living around you today. Most have rather dull colors, suited more for blending into their environment. Those with bright colors usually use their coloration as a warning or to attract mates. It is safe to assume that dinosaurs had similar coloration for similar reasons. 

HOWEVER, we may be getting closer to actually determining exactly what skin colors and color patterns some dinosaurs had. Thanks to some ground breaking, state-of-the-art research presently being conducted by a few paleontologists, for the first time, we're just beginning to be able to "see" the colors of dinosaurs that have been dead for tens of millions of years!